Journal Give-away & Writing to Heal Discussion

Writing to heal

 Maria Galleher is such an amazing teacher that I only subbed for her the last few years I subbed. She always dealt with any problems & the kids would apologize & be really respectful after that.

She teaches Food Justice & Peer Counseling & she does Conflict Resolution at the school. 

I had these journals & pens because I was going to do Life Writing workshops with women in this home for women with mental health issues. But since I wasn’t able to do it because of covid, I brought them in to give to her students. 

It was a really good presentation that just came together naturally. 

I was re-reading a book on how writing ✍️ heals. Most of what was in the book was much too high level for a high school group, but at least it got me thinking about how important writing is to healing. 

I’ve been thinking a lot about how we let our emotions run wild & how they can ruin relationships. 

The emotions are from unresolved trauma. I talked about how journaling had gotten me through many difficult times in my life. Then Maria asked for examples from them. I was pleased to see that several of them already knew about the healing power of writing.

“If we can write ✍️ about it, we may be able to come to an understanding that allows us to have a better life.” 

There are lots of books on this but this author researched authors who say writing healed them. Isabel Allende was one of her examples & she is one of my favorite authors. Her daughter was in a hospital room dying & she started writing to her while in that room. The book is called Paula

There are many authors who talk about how they healed from their pain by writing. 

“When you get your masters, maybe you can explore this subject.”

When I first started teaching, I encountered an excerpt of “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” along with an assignment to write an Autobiographical Incident. After that, I gave that assignment to every class I taught. I also showed the movie.

“They also did stories similar to those in House on Mango Street. My students would make a book & illustrate it.” 

My students loved reading each other’s booklets. It was really powerful. 

With Maria’s help, we had some great discussion. I wanted to share all the slides she made while I was doing the presentation, but I can only get them to come up at the top of the page.

Please feel free to share my ideas & add to them for any group you might want to help write. Journaling can take you anywhere. It’s the best therapy out there In My Humble Opinion.

Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.

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On-line vs. In-person Classes

Before 2020 very few students took courses on-line though I had. I also took a course through TV (PBS) once.

I find it sad that the vast majority are choosing on-line over in-person classes, but I kinda understand too. I got my MFA completely online (in ‘09). It was perfect for a writer because we weren’t being judged for our looks or personality but completely on our writing.
We didn’t zoom & could do the work whenever we wanted. Some students were in other countries; some even in war zones.
It saved hours not having to drive & find parking (or even shower!)
But there’s nothing like being in a classroom with a group of like-minded people. It’s too bad colleges & universities never tried to find a way to make that experience more nurturing.

The MFA in Creative Writing mostly seemed to be for teaching writing although yes, we did turn in work & were critiqued in the majority of my on-line classes. Because much of it is peer critiques, the quality of the program depends on the level of the other students, as well as how involved the professor is. Of course, this is true with in-person classes too.

Most of what I learned about story arc & character arc, I learned on my own. Later I took local courses that reaffirmed what I taught myself about story structure, etc. I am fortunate that we have SDInk here with many courses & amazing instructors, some of whom are college professors. Others are here from Hollywood. I, personally, need the classes to keep me writing, especially at the beginning of a project. I need the feedback.

I don’t watch YouTube videos. Not to learn. But others do. Seems to be a man thing. So, if it works for you: Go for it!

The other thing I discovered when you are not getting a degree is that the instructors bring their heart into their teaching. The No. 1 instructor I have had to date is Marni Freeman, a woman who would stab herself before she’d ever allow herself to make a student feel bad. Whenever she makes suggestions, she asks how you feel about it. I have even cried about the memories I was writing about & she came over & hugged me.

Of course, Marni is a therapist, so she understands how important it is NOT to make someone feel bad about themselves. She also teaches memoir so she is in the perfect field for her skillset (and heartset).

  • I Forgot to mention that many of the SDInk courses are now done through Zoom with us submitting our work thru email (except for those savvy enough to show them on the Zoom screen).

Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself by K.M. Weiland

I wanted to share something for writers & more importantly, for those who need a gentle push to start writing. This is perfect.    ❤ Sherrie

APRIL 20, 2020 by

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself

Writing—especially the writing of stories—is ultimately a relationship with oneself. It is true that we write to communicate with others. Perhaps that is even the foremost conscious motivation sometimes. But communication itself necessitates a relationship, and what we are trying to communicate is ourselves—that unfolding inner dialogue between the Self and the self, the observer and the observed, the unconscious and the conscious, the Muse and the Recorder.

You must have a relationship with your stories before your readers can, and really this is a relationship with yourself. In recognizing this, writing becomes both an investigative tool for getting to know yourself better and a vast playground for exploration and experimentation on a deeply personal level. Depth psychologist Jean Shinoda Bolen points out:

Creative work comes out of an intense and passionate involvement—almost as if with a lover, as one (the artist) interacts with the “other” to bring something new into being. This “other” may be a painting, a dance form, a musical composition, a sculpture, a poem or a manuscript, a new theory or invention, that for a time is all-absorbing and fascinating.

Particularly in this ongoing period of quarantine and isolation, it can be a tremendously rewarding process to use writing to improve your relationship with yourself. Whether you live alone right now or in a crowded house, the one person you cannot escape, the one person who will always be there for you, is you.

Too often, I think we underestimate this person and our relationship with him or her. We’d rather distract ourselves or hang with someone else because limiting beliefs lead us to think this most intimate of all relationships is too flawed, too painful, too shallow. Isn’t this why writing sometimes scares us so badly we can barely sit at the computer? It is also, I believe, why most of us come to the page in the first place: this person within has something to say and so long as this communication comes out in the form of fun and colorful stories, we are willing to sit still and listen in ways we are rarely willing to offer during the rest of life.

The more we learn to listen to the self that appears on the page, the more we will become conscious of the things we are truly desiring to communicate—both to ourselves and eventually to readers. Writing becomes not just distraction, entertainment, or vocation—it becomes an ever-deepening relationship with life itself.

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself

Today, I want to talk about several ways in which our writing reveals itself as a relationship with ourselves—and how we can embrace and deepen our approaches to this magnificent form of self-exploration and self-expression.

1. Dreams, the Shadow, and the Unconscious

How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream.–Gaston Bachelard

From Where You Dream Robert Olen Butler

I don’t know about you, but my actual night dreams are all but useless as story material. They’re an evocative smear of rehashed memories and crazy symbolism. My dream journal, although sometimes revealing, is usually more amusing than anything. More easily interpreted are the revelations I discover in my stories. Even more than my actual writing, my ability to consciously enter what I (and Robert Olen Butler) call the “dreamzone” is a mainline to my unconscious.

Your stories are “out loud” dreams. Even though you may exercise nominal control over their subject and direction, the best of them are effortless blasts of imagery and feeling straight up from your depths. Once your body of work is large enough for you to start recognizing patterns and cross-referencing them with the happenings of your own life, you will be able to mine your stories for some of your inner self’s deepest treasures.

It surprises me that more depth psychologists don’t reference and analyze stories in the same way they do dreams. Although I have always known my stories must offer an unwitting commentary about myself, it wasn’t until the last few years that I began to be able to recognize some unintended, occasionally even prescient, parallels between the things I was writing at a given time and the things that were either happening or about to happen in my own life.

More than that, your stories, your characters, and the scenarios and themes you write about are often revelations of the hidden parts of you—your shadow self, or the aspects of your personality you have not yet made conscious. Hidden emotions, desires, and even memories can surface in our writing, there for us to recognize if only we look. Some of our discoveries will be glorious and magical; others will be difficult and painful. But all are instructive.

2. Personal Archetypes and Symbols

Archetypal stories and characters—those that offer universal symbolism—resonate with people everywhere. Whenever you hear of a particularly popular story, you can be pretty sure the reason for its prevalent and enduring success is its archetypal underpinnings. This is a vastly useful bit of information if you want to write a successful story of your own. But it is also useful because an understanding of archetypes and symbolism can offer you a guide to translating you own inner hieroglyphs.

Consider your characters. What types of characters consistently appear in your stories? These are likely archetypes that are deeply personal to, representative of, and perhaps even transformative for you. Just as in dream analysis, it is useful to remember that every character is you. The wounded warrior, the damsel in distress, the sadistic villain—each represents a facet of yourpsychological landscape.

I’ve long thought we all have just one story to tell which we go on telling over and over in different ways. I’ve also heard it said that all authors have roughly a dozen actors in their playhouse—and we just keep recasting them in new stories. There’s truth to this. Certainly, I can recognize decided archetypes that perennially fascinate me however I try to dress them up in unique costumes from story to story.

As these patterns emerge over time, I get better at recognizing what they represent. Sometimes I am almost embarrassed to realize how much of myself I have bled onto the pages of my novels—secrets so intimate even Ididn’t know them at the time I wrote them. Chuck Palahniuk observes aptly:

The act of writing is a way of tricking yourself into revealing something that you would never consciously put into the world. Sometimes I’m shocked by the deeply personal things I’ve put into books without realizing it.

Learning to speak the language of archetype and symbol can grant you tremendously exciting perception into your inner self. Stories that you loved when you wrote them, that meant one precious thing to you at the time of creation, can come to offer all new treasures even years after your first interactions with them.

3. Emotional and Hypothetical Exploration

Writing is also, always and ever, a conscious dialogue with ourselves. We put something onto the page; the page—that is to say, ourselves—responds. And the conversation takes off! Jean Shinoda Bolen again:

The “relationship” dialogue is then between the person and the work, from which something new emerges. For example, observe the process when a painter is engaged with paint and canvas. An absorbed interchange occurs: the artist reacts or is receptive to the creative accidents of paint and brush; she initiates actively with bold stroke, nuance, and color; and then, seeing what happens, she responds. It is an interaction; spontaneity combines with skill. It is an interplay between artist and canvas, and as a result something is created that never before existed.

Although we may not be fully conscious of everything we’re saying about ourselves when we first put a story to words, we almost always begin with some conscious intent. We are writing to experience something—perhaps something we’ve already experienced and want to recreate or relive, or perhaps something hypothetical that we wish to experiment with in a simulated way.

Even outrageous story events, such as fantasy battles or melodramatic love scenes, which we know are impossible or unlikely in reality, can still offer us the ability to symbolically create and process our own emotions. When we are angry, we often write scenes of passionate intensity. When we are stressed, we sometimes write horrifying but cathartic scenes or perhaps loving and comforting scenes.

Sometimes emotion pours out in ways that shock us, and when it does we have the opportunity to follow up and seek the root of something true and honest within ourselves that we perhaps have not fully acknowledged.

It is as if we say to the page: “Joy.” And a scene comes pouring out of us and shows a vivid dreamscape of what joy means to us. Or perhaps we simply wish to present a functional scene in which characters act out gratitude, trauma, love, or grief—and what we discover is our own sometimes stunning emotional response. We speak—and the page speaks back.

4. Logical and Creative Dialogues

I’ve always liked the idea of a dialogue between the left or logical brain and the right or creative brain. Both logic and creativity are wonderful in their unique ways, and both are intrinsic to a full realization of each other.

Of first importance is making sure neither the logical self nor the creative self is overpowering the other. Too often, the creative self is beaten down and starved by a dominant and cruel logic that criticizes every word creativity puts on the page. But creativity can also run wild, like an unruly child with no regard for the advice of its logical parent.

In order to appreciate and cultivate a relationship with both these aspects, we must make sure they respect each other enough to carry on a balanced back-and-forth conversation. This can happen moment by moment when we’re in the throes of writing—our creative minds manifesting ideas and our logical minds putting those ideas to words. But it can also be looked at as a larger dialogue in which different parts of the writing process become the domain of one half of the brain or the other.

Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success by K.M. Weiland

I consider the early conception stages—those of imagining, daydreaming, and dreamzoning—to be deeply creative, with very little logical input. Then comes the more conscious brainstorming of outlining, in which I sculpt my dreams and logically work through plot problems. This is followed by writing itself, in which creativity is again brought front and center as I dream my ideas to life on the page. And finally, logic returns to trim the ragged edges during editing.

Understanding how we interact with these two vital halves of personality gives us an edge in honing all parts of our writing. Likewise, in honing our writing, we are given the opportunity to shape these two opposing aspects of ourselves. Very often, one or the other is undervalued or underdeveloped. In learning to respect and appreciate both—and to give both room to properly do their jobs, while maintaining communication with one another—we can refine their presence in our larger lives.

***

In so many ways, writing is the study of the soul. Stories allow us to study the collective soul of humanity. But ourstories particularly allow us to study our own souls, to suss out their treasures, relieve their wounds, celebrate their uniqueness, and share their common features.

Wordplayers, tell me your opinions! How do you think your writing improves your relationship with yourself? Tell me in the comments!

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

The World Reflects You

Meta-Thoughts®

Inspirational ideas that may change the way you think.

CHECK OUT INGRID’S NEW BOOK:
The Word Search Sage: Yoga for the Brain

Featuring Ingrid’s Meta-Thoughts®
Available on Amazon.com
http://amzn.to/2k279TO

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Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

2017 – Read the best of ADVENTURE Novel Stories from around the world:

Letter to A Brit about the need for group: “People for the Ethical Treatment of Humans”

Hello Derek,

I am not sure what country you are from, but I can tell you that activists in the U.S. have been watched for years, decades, in fact! Have you ever heard of COINTELPRO? Well, in the 80s, when we protested the wars in Central America, we weren’t just being watched, we were being infiltrated. At the time, I thought my boyfriend (who later became my husband, then my ex), I was sure that he was being totally paranoid, covering his face with a large bandana whenever the media showed up.

Later we were made aware that we had an infiltrator, probably not the first, but this one was so obvious, because he gave his name as the brother of a Salvadoran in the group. This caused the group, in their naiveté, to tell him stuff about the member who “happened” to have the same last name and a brother with the same first name.

There were probably other infiltrators, but they would say that they came for the women. It seems that the politically active woman had a reputation of being “looser” than other women.

There were also phone calls when we had speakers come from Central America. They named names and threatened members’ lives.

Two of our members were visited by the FBI. One was an American citizen though her two twin sisters were working for the Sandinista government. The other one was a Salvadoran whose visa had run out when he stopped taking classes at the university that brought him there.

There were also Cubans doing a small counter demonstration every time we had an anti-war demonstration. They were allowed to have their signs on poles that had been sharpened so they could use them as a weapon. We, on the other hand, were warned that we would be arrested if we carried anything that looked like a weapon.

Then, one day, one of our members got hold of his FBI file. Most of it was blacked out, but the few words and sentences we could read were total lies. They said he was an alcoholic, though he drank one to two beers a day. They also said he was a womanizer, sleeping with all kinds of women, when, in fact, despite not having a girlfriend, he never came on to any of the women and we never knew of any that went home with him for the night.

About fifteen years after this incident, I got a postcard from the Freedom of Information Act saying I could get a copy of my file for $25. I have no idea why I didn’t order it. If it WAS filled with blacked-out lines, it would still have been interesting to see what was there and how much was the truth.

Back then (in the 90s), it was said that one in four Americans have FBI files. I can’t help but wonder how high that ratio is today. My guess would be much higher. The protests are larger and more often. The issues are often local rather than about issues in other countries or even other parts of this country.

Anyway, my friend, my suspicion is that people actually do care more about that bloody dog than that bloodied person. From what I can see, we have become numb to human suffering. It is faked in so many TV shows and movies that people feel they’ve seen everything. With PETA around, making sure that the world knows when animals are mistreated, people think about their own pets and are outraged. We need a PETH (People for the Ethical Treatment of Humans) so that the world starts demanding the ethical treatment of humans and people start thinking about their family and friends whenever they see a bloodied and tortured human being.

Sincerely,

An American who has seen a lot

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

Good News about the Film “The Boys Who Said No!”

Good news about the film- and a request!
Boys Who Said NO! – C Colorado Jones to youshow details
boys-logo 3.jpg
Judith Ehrlich, Director
Christopher C. Jones, Producer
Bill Prince, Co-Producer
Robert Cooney, Advisor
Steve Ladd, Advisor
Lee Swenson, Advisor
Robert Levering, Advisor
C. Colorado Jones Productions
P. O. Box 14008
San Francisco, CA 94114
[415] 812-8692

ccoloradojones@yahoo.com
http://www.boyswhosaidno.com

May 10, 2017

Dear Friends and Fellow Resisters,

We’re writing to share some good news with you – and a request!

The good news is, thanks to your support, director Judith Ehrlich is in the studio now with our chief editor working to craft a 90 minute rough cut from the many hours of interviews, archival footage, and music.

We are also excited because as part of our research for the film we found that reputable scholars concluded draft resistance had a significant impact – causing the collapse of the draft system and was a big factor in ending the Vietnam War.

With a broad “resistance” movement growing once again, telling this story on film is more important than we imagined when we first started production. If nonviolent resistance could stop a powerful military from carrying out an unjust war, imagine what nonviolent activists today can do!

There’s also some good news on the fundraising front. We were recently awarded a $75,000 grant! This is our biggest single contribution to date, and solid confirmation that the film is an important and timely one.

While that grant moves us closer to completing the flm, creating a high-quality documentary film requires substantial funding, especially in the last phases of production. The expenses alone associated with securing necessary rights and insurance are projected to be $88,000.

Thanks to you and 800 others, we have raised the majority of our budget – over $300,000. Now, to finish the film and begin distributing it we need to raise a final $200,000. We know we can get there!

Here’s our request of you:

In this last critical year of production, please consider making
a significant contribution to help us complete the film.

Can we count on you?

We are very grateful for your support to date! We could not have gotten this far without you.

On behalf of the BOYS film team, thank you again for your generous support — both your dollars and your far-reaching vision!

For peace, justice and equality,
Christopher Jones, Producer
Bill Prince, MD, Co-Producer
http://www.boyswhosaidno.com
P.S. – Remember that every dollar you donate to the film is tax-deductible and will reduce your tax dollars supporting Trump’s military buildup!
Donate online with a credit card. Or make a check out to the Resource Center for Nonviolence – RCNV – and send to PO Box 14008, San Francisco, CA 94114.
P.P.S. – Should you need more inspiration to make a donation, here’s a private link to preview a recently rough film segment on resistance actions at the Los Angeles induction center:

vimeo.com/211762647 Password: BWSN_LA

boys-logo 3.jpg

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

Holstee Manifesto, plus an article about Joseph Campbell’s “The Power of Myth” – found on Brain Pickings

I wrote to Maria Popova, writer & editor of Brain Pickings. I explained that allowing us to repost her articles would give us great copy to share, as well as expose her work to a wider audience. I hope that she decides to allow this!                                                                              Here’s a great article about Joseph Campbells’ book “The Power of Myth.” He talks about “Finding Your Bliss.” Enjoy!  😉  ❤                                               https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/04/09/find-your-bliss-joseph-campbell-power-of-myth/.                                                                                                                                                     Holstee’s Manifesto is below:

holsteemanifesto.jpg

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

The Happiness Tag

The Happiness Tag..
There are three simple rules and here they are.
List:
5 Things that make you happy.
5 Songs that make you happy.
5 Bloggers that make you happy. Let them know you nominate them and you are done.

Here goes. This is off the top of my head, so I will probably end up coming back & adding something important that I remember.
5 Things that Make Me Happy:
1) My husband. Always no. 1. Don’t have to think about that. Except he might not like being called a “thing.” 😉 ❤
2) My book being published & available to the word. Of course, I still need to get it translated into Spanish, but I will … sometime soon … I hope …
Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
3) The video my piano-playing husband made for my book.
Angelo made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

51UX4f00CBL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
4) My home. I love my historical home in old CV, but I also love the fact that for the first time in my life, I am part of a “real” community. I know my neighbors, other historical home owners & many of the young people. I had a community when I lived in New Orleans, but we were separate from the powers that be: we were the outcasts: the change makers, feminists & anti-war & protesters. We also protested the police violence there.
So far, here in CV, I haven’t protested anyone publicly! 😉 ❤
5) Last, but not least, is my dad. This man was there for me in good times & bad. He warmed my hands in winter & took me (& all the family) on picnics in summer. My dad believed in me when no one else did & I will always be grateful for that! He celebrated his 86th birthday this past April! 😉 ❤
6) I am adding my mom here. If you look at no. 5 below, you will see why. I love you, Mom, & I remember you everyday! ❤ ❤ ❤
5 Songs that Make Me Happy
1) Imagine, by John Lennon
2) All Simon & Garfunkel songs, esp. Sounds of Silence.
3) All of the rest of Paul Simon’s songs, including “Diamonds on the Soles of her Shoes.”
4) All the Beatles’ songs – Here’s one list of the top 50 Beatles’ songs: https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2015/08/50-best-beatles-songs.html?a=1
“Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” is a favorite of mine, but the only video I could find that really was the Beatles is blocked in the US, but if you’re not in the US, it’s No. 18 on the list above.
5) “Where Have All the Flowers Gone” – an anti-war song that my mother introduced to me when I was just a kid. I am only now realizing how much my mother influenced me, how much I learned about injustice, about compassion & love from my mother.
5 Bloggers that make me happy:
1) Art by Rob Goldstein – Rob is an amazing artist & I also feel that socially & politically, we are kindred spirits, both wanting more love & justice in the world. I just found this gorgeous art of his & a beautiful poem. This link will take you to any blogpost:
A Quick Note to God
He’s also like me in that he reblogs a lot of other people’s posts. 😉 ❤
2) I don’t get over to Kendall F. Person’s blog enough (I need to make sure I am still following him), but here is a beautiful post about an event starting on Monday:
ANGELS
3) Chris, the Story Reading Ape is one of my all-time favorite blogs. Chris supports authors & posts helpful writing advice. Here’s one: https://thestoryreadingapeblog.com/2016/06/23/classification-of-book-lovers-infographic/
4) Here’s a poem dedicated to Elfkat, whose blog, Adventures and Musings of an Archduidess can keep you so busy, you might have to be reminded you have a live to live:
https://elfkat.wordpress.com/2016/07/27/a-prayer-for-the-grieving/
5) DRay has so much to share on his blog Dream Big & Dream Often that I should get over there more OFTEN!
6 Mindsets People Have That Will Always Lead to Underachieving
Tag, you’re it!
Peace, love & happiness for all,
Sherrie

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

May 1st, 1969: Mr. Rogers testifies before the Senate Subcommittee on Communications

Mr. Rogers tells the Senate Subcommittee why it is important to support Children’s TV. We need to try & repeat this at a time when children grow up witnessing violence on TV.

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

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saania2806.wordpress.com/

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