From Oprah: 5 Strategies for Breaking a Negative Thought Loop

It’s almost as if Oprah can read my mind!

The author of The Anxiety Toolkit explains how we get caught in negative, fear-based ideas—and how to break free.By Dr. Alice Boyes

Photo: Maiwolf Photography/Cultura/Getty Images   Believe it or not, psychologists have a term to describe people who like to think a lot. The trait is called need for cognition. It refers to people who enjoy effortful thinking and feel motivated to attempt to understand and make sense of things. For the most part, this is associated with positive traits, like openness, higher self-esteem and lower social anxiety. On the flip side, some types of intensive thinking—notably rumination and worry—tend to be associated with being closed to new ideas and poor mental health. Anxiety and rumination form a feedback loop where one causes the other. Here, you’ll learn to recognize when you’re ruminating so you can disrupt the loop. 

1. Identify When You’re Ruminating

To reduce your rumination, you’re first going to need to identify it. Rumination can be about minor issues (“Why did I pay $4.20 for gas at the first gas station off the highway when I could’ve driven a half-mile down the road and paid $3.60? I shouldn’t have been so stupid…etc.”). Rumination can also be more heavy-duty self-criticism (“What’s wrong with me? I have these dreams but I don’t make them happen. Am I just full of hot air? Maybe I don’t want them badly enough? Am I a just a big fraud?”) Ruminating can sometimes be a bit like daydreaming, in that people often get lost in rumination without realizing they’re doing it. 

Experiment: Fill in the following blanks to create a list of topics you ruminate on: Replaying conversations with people in power positions in your life. For example, replaying conversations, including email conversations, with ______ [insert names of people] ______. 

Replaying memories of experiences of failure from the past, for example ______. 

Thinking about ways in which you’re not as perfect as you’d like to be. For example, thinking you’re not as good at ______ as you’d like. 

Thinking about things you should be doing to be more successful, such as ______.

Photo: CommerceandCultureAgency/Getty Images   Become Aware of Memory BiasWhen people are anxious they often have biased recall for events. For example, Brian talks himself into believing he screwed up an interview for a promotion because he thinks over and over about things he could’ve said. However, he doesn’t as easily recall the good answers he gave. He endlessly mentally rehashes ambiguous cues the interviewers gave off, such as appearing to rush through questions, but doesn’t as easily recall when the interviewers responded positively. 

Experiment: Do you have any current rumination topics where memory bias might be playing a role? Answer the following questions: 

1. What’s your ruminating mind telling you? 

2. What are the objective data telling you about whether your ruminative thoughts are likely to be correct? 

3. Are you recalling feedback as harsher than it was or recalling blips in your performance as worse than they were?

Photo: Peopleimages.com/Digital Vision/Getty Images   Distinguish Between Worry/Rumination and Helpful Problem-SolvingPeople who are heavy worriers tend to believe that worrying helps them make good decisions. However, rather than helping you problem-solve, rumination and worry usually just make it difficult to see the forest for the trees. Do you think people who worry a lot about getting cancer are more likely to do self-exams, have their moles mapped or eat a healthy diet? According to research, the opposite is probably true. For example, one study showed that women who were prone to rumination took an average of 39 days longer to seek help after noticing a breast lump. 

Experiment: To check for yourself whether ruminating and worrying lead to useful actions, try tracking the time you spend ruminating or worrying for a week. If a week is too much of a commitment, you could try two days—one weekday and one weekend day. When you notice yourself ruminating or worrying, write down the approximate number of minutes you spend doing it. The following day, note any times when ruminating/worrying led to useful solutions. Calculate your ratio: How many minutes did you spend overthinking for each useful solution it generated?

Photo: Jamie Grill/Blend Images/Getty Images   Reduce Self-CriticismReducing self-criticism is a critical part of reducing rumination. People who are in a pattern of trying to use self-criticism as motivation often fear that reducing it will make them lazy. It won’t. In fact, giving yourself a compassionate rather than critical message will often lead to working harder. For example, one study showed that people who did a hard test and got a compassionate message afterward were willing to study longer for future similar tests, compared to a group of people who took the same test but didn’t get a compassionate message. 

Experiment: To practice using self-compassion as an alternative to self-criticism, try the following three-minute writing exercise. Identify a mistake or weakness that you want to focus on and then write for three minutes using the following instructions: “Imagine that you are talking to yourself about this weakness (or mistake) from a compassionate and understanding perspective. What would you say?”

Photo: Jamie Grill/Iconica/Getty Images   Recognize When You’re Criticizing Yourself Just for Feeling AnxiousShould/shouldn’t thinking traps are a common problem for anxiety-prone people. These can come in several varieties, virtually all of which can prolong and intensify rumination—for example, “I shouldn’t ever let anyone down,” which is an example of excessive responsibility taking. 

Try to notice when you get caught in should/shouldn’t thinking traps in which you criticize yourself just for feeling anxious. For example, “I should be able to handle life much better” or “I shouldn’t get anxious about such little issues.” If this happens, give yourself compassion for the fact that you feel anxious, regardless of whether the anxiety is logical or not. Think of it this way: If a kid was scared of monsters, you wouldn’t withhold compassion and empathy just because the monsters aren’t real. Treat yourself with the same caring. A common mistake people make is to think they need to give themselves excessive encouragement, praise or pep talks while they’re feeling anxious—you don’t. Taking a patient and compassionate attitude about the fact you’re experiencing anxiety is an overlooked strategy that helps anxious feelings pass quickly. 

Experiment: Try this: Switch out any shoulds hidden in your self-talk and replace them with prefer. For example, instead of saying “I should have achieved more by now” try “I would prefer to have achieved more by now.” 

This is a simple, specific, repeatable example of how you can talk to yourself in a kinder, more patient way. These tiny self-interventions may seem ridiculously simple, but they work. They may not seem like they shift your anxiety to a huge degree; however, they can help you disrupt your rumination just enough to give you a small window of clear mental space. This allows you to start doing something useful rather than keep ruminating. 

The Anxiety Toolbox

This adapted excerpt was taken from The Anxiety Toolkit: Strategies for Fine-Tuning Your Mind and Moving Past Your Stuck Points by Dr. Alice Boyes. Dr. Boyes is an emotions expert forWomen’s Health magazine (AU), and a popular blogger for PsychologyToday.com. You can get the first chapter of her book for free by subscribing to her blog updates here. She’s on Twitter @DrAliceBoyes.Published 05/14/2015

Read more: https://www.oprah.com/inspiration/strategies-for-getting-unstuck/all#ixzz74nVcgGG3

Check out Book 1, then 2. Book 3 will be out in a year or so.

Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself by K.M. Weiland

I wanted to share something for writers & more importantly, for those who need a gentle push to start writing. This is perfect.    ❤ Sherrie

APRIL 20, 2020 by

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself

Writing—especially the writing of stories—is ultimately a relationship with oneself. It is true that we write to communicate with others. Perhaps that is even the foremost conscious motivation sometimes. But communication itself necessitates a relationship, and what we are trying to communicate is ourselves—that unfolding inner dialogue between the Self and the self, the observer and the observed, the unconscious and the conscious, the Muse and the Recorder.

You must have a relationship with your stories before your readers can, and really this is a relationship with yourself. In recognizing this, writing becomes both an investigative tool for getting to know yourself better and a vast playground for exploration and experimentation on a deeply personal level. Depth psychologist Jean Shinoda Bolen points out:

Creative work comes out of an intense and passionate involvement—almost as if with a lover, as one (the artist) interacts with the “other” to bring something new into being. This “other” may be a painting, a dance form, a musical composition, a sculpture, a poem or a manuscript, a new theory or invention, that for a time is all-absorbing and fascinating.

Particularly in this ongoing period of quarantine and isolation, it can be a tremendously rewarding process to use writing to improve your relationship with yourself. Whether you live alone right now or in a crowded house, the one person you cannot escape, the one person who will always be there for you, is you.

Too often, I think we underestimate this person and our relationship with him or her. We’d rather distract ourselves or hang with someone else because limiting beliefs lead us to think this most intimate of all relationships is too flawed, too painful, too shallow. Isn’t this why writing sometimes scares us so badly we can barely sit at the computer? It is also, I believe, why most of us come to the page in the first place: this person within has something to say and so long as this communication comes out in the form of fun and colorful stories, we are willing to sit still and listen in ways we are rarely willing to offer during the rest of life.

The more we learn to listen to the self that appears on the page, the more we will become conscious of the things we are truly desiring to communicate—both to ourselves and eventually to readers. Writing becomes not just distraction, entertainment, or vocation—it becomes an ever-deepening relationship with life itself.

4 Ways Writing Improves Your Relationship With Yourself

Today, I want to talk about several ways in which our writing reveals itself as a relationship with ourselves—and how we can embrace and deepen our approaches to this magnificent form of self-exploration and self-expression.

1. Dreams, the Shadow, and the Unconscious

How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream.–Gaston Bachelard

From Where You Dream Robert Olen Butler

I don’t know about you, but my actual night dreams are all but useless as story material. They’re an evocative smear of rehashed memories and crazy symbolism. My dream journal, although sometimes revealing, is usually more amusing than anything. More easily interpreted are the revelations I discover in my stories. Even more than my actual writing, my ability to consciously enter what I (and Robert Olen Butler) call the “dreamzone” is a mainline to my unconscious.

Your stories are “out loud” dreams. Even though you may exercise nominal control over their subject and direction, the best of them are effortless blasts of imagery and feeling straight up from your depths. Once your body of work is large enough for you to start recognizing patterns and cross-referencing them with the happenings of your own life, you will be able to mine your stories for some of your inner self’s deepest treasures.

It surprises me that more depth psychologists don’t reference and analyze stories in the same way they do dreams. Although I have always known my stories must offer an unwitting commentary about myself, it wasn’t until the last few years that I began to be able to recognize some unintended, occasionally even prescient, parallels between the things I was writing at a given time and the things that were either happening or about to happen in my own life.

More than that, your stories, your characters, and the scenarios and themes you write about are often revelations of the hidden parts of you—your shadow self, or the aspects of your personality you have not yet made conscious. Hidden emotions, desires, and even memories can surface in our writing, there for us to recognize if only we look. Some of our discoveries will be glorious and magical; others will be difficult and painful. But all are instructive.

2. Personal Archetypes and Symbols

Archetypal stories and characters—those that offer universal symbolism—resonate with people everywhere. Whenever you hear of a particularly popular story, you can be pretty sure the reason for its prevalent and enduring success is its archetypal underpinnings. This is a vastly useful bit of information if you want to write a successful story of your own. But it is also useful because an understanding of archetypes and symbolism can offer you a guide to translating you own inner hieroglyphs.

Consider your characters. What types of characters consistently appear in your stories? These are likely archetypes that are deeply personal to, representative of, and perhaps even transformative for you. Just as in dream analysis, it is useful to remember that every character is you. The wounded warrior, the damsel in distress, the sadistic villain—each represents a facet of yourpsychological landscape.

I’ve long thought we all have just one story to tell which we go on telling over and over in different ways. I’ve also heard it said that all authors have roughly a dozen actors in their playhouse—and we just keep recasting them in new stories. There’s truth to this. Certainly, I can recognize decided archetypes that perennially fascinate me however I try to dress them up in unique costumes from story to story.

As these patterns emerge over time, I get better at recognizing what they represent. Sometimes I am almost embarrassed to realize how much of myself I have bled onto the pages of my novels—secrets so intimate even Ididn’t know them at the time I wrote them. Chuck Palahniuk observes aptly:

The act of writing is a way of tricking yourself into revealing something that you would never consciously put into the world. Sometimes I’m shocked by the deeply personal things I’ve put into books without realizing it.

Learning to speak the language of archetype and symbol can grant you tremendously exciting perception into your inner self. Stories that you loved when you wrote them, that meant one precious thing to you at the time of creation, can come to offer all new treasures even years after your first interactions with them.

3. Emotional and Hypothetical Exploration

Writing is also, always and ever, a conscious dialogue with ourselves. We put something onto the page; the page—that is to say, ourselves—responds. And the conversation takes off! Jean Shinoda Bolen again:

The “relationship” dialogue is then between the person and the work, from which something new emerges. For example, observe the process when a painter is engaged with paint and canvas. An absorbed interchange occurs: the artist reacts or is receptive to the creative accidents of paint and brush; she initiates actively with bold stroke, nuance, and color; and then, seeing what happens, she responds. It is an interaction; spontaneity combines with skill. It is an interplay between artist and canvas, and as a result something is created that never before existed.

Although we may not be fully conscious of everything we’re saying about ourselves when we first put a story to words, we almost always begin with some conscious intent. We are writing to experience something—perhaps something we’ve already experienced and want to recreate or relive, or perhaps something hypothetical that we wish to experiment with in a simulated way.

Even outrageous story events, such as fantasy battles or melodramatic love scenes, which we know are impossible or unlikely in reality, can still offer us the ability to symbolically create and process our own emotions. When we are angry, we often write scenes of passionate intensity. When we are stressed, we sometimes write horrifying but cathartic scenes or perhaps loving and comforting scenes.

Sometimes emotion pours out in ways that shock us, and when it does we have the opportunity to follow up and seek the root of something true and honest within ourselves that we perhaps have not fully acknowledged.

It is as if we say to the page: “Joy.” And a scene comes pouring out of us and shows a vivid dreamscape of what joy means to us. Or perhaps we simply wish to present a functional scene in which characters act out gratitude, trauma, love, or grief—and what we discover is our own sometimes stunning emotional response. We speak—and the page speaks back.

4. Logical and Creative Dialogues

I’ve always liked the idea of a dialogue between the left or logical brain and the right or creative brain. Both logic and creativity are wonderful in their unique ways, and both are intrinsic to a full realization of each other.

Of first importance is making sure neither the logical self nor the creative self is overpowering the other. Too often, the creative self is beaten down and starved by a dominant and cruel logic that criticizes every word creativity puts on the page. But creativity can also run wild, like an unruly child with no regard for the advice of its logical parent.

In order to appreciate and cultivate a relationship with both these aspects, we must make sure they respect each other enough to carry on a balanced back-and-forth conversation. This can happen moment by moment when we’re in the throes of writing—our creative minds manifesting ideas and our logical minds putting those ideas to words. But it can also be looked at as a larger dialogue in which different parts of the writing process become the domain of one half of the brain or the other.

Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success by K.M. Weiland

I consider the early conception stages—those of imagining, daydreaming, and dreamzoning—to be deeply creative, with very little logical input. Then comes the more conscious brainstorming of outlining, in which I sculpt my dreams and logically work through plot problems. This is followed by writing itself, in which creativity is again brought front and center as I dream my ideas to life on the page. And finally, logic returns to trim the ragged edges during editing.

Understanding how we interact with these two vital halves of personality gives us an edge in honing all parts of our writing. Likewise, in honing our writing, we are given the opportunity to shape these two opposing aspects of ourselves. Very often, one or the other is undervalued or underdeveloped. In learning to respect and appreciate both—and to give both room to properly do their jobs, while maintaining communication with one another—we can refine their presence in our larger lives.

***

In so many ways, writing is the study of the soul. Stories allow us to study the collective soul of humanity. But ourstories particularly allow us to study our own souls, to suss out their treasures, relieve their wounds, celebrate their uniqueness, and share their common features.

Wordplayers, tell me your opinions! How do you think your writing improves your relationship with yourself? Tell me in the comments!

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

Penguin Books Coming Out Soon

I obviously haven’t read these, but as an author, I like to share books.
And while we’re on that subject, what do you think about me posting short reviews of recent books I’ve read? I can easily find them on Amazon and/or Goodreads.
Let me know!
And keep your eyes open for the prequel to SLIES (see below for more info). It’s titled “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans: Shelly’s Journey Begins.” It will be out in April.

Books Coming Soon in 2020

In whis ultimate preview guide, discover the biggest new releases coming out in the next few months! From edge-of-your-seat thrillers to swoon-worthy love stories, you’ll be the first to know when your next favorite book is hitting the bookshelves.

The Two Lives of Lydia Bird Book Cover Picture

The Two Lives of Lydia Bird

by Josie Silver

Written with Josie Silver’s trademark warmth and wit, The Two Lives of Lydia Bird is a powerful and thrilling love story about the what-ifs that arise at life’s crossroads, and what happens when one woman is given a miraculous chance to answer them.
  1. The Glass Hotel Book Cover Picture

    The Glass Hotel

    by Emily St. John Mandel

    From the award-winning author of Station Eleven (“Ingenious.” – The New York Times), an exhilarating novel set at the glittering intersection of two seemingly disparate events-a massive Ponzi scheme collapse and the mysterious disappearance of a woman from a ship at sea.
  2. Camino Winds Book Cover Picture

    Camino Winds

    by John Grisham

    Welcome back to Camino Island, where anything can happen—even a murder in the midst of a hurricane, which might prove to be the perfect crime . . .
  3. Eat a Peach Book Cover Picture

    Eat a Peach

    by David Chang and Gabe Ulla

    The chef behind Momofuku and star of Netflix’s Ugly Delicious gets uncomfortably real in his debut memoir. David Chang lays bare his self-doubt and ruminates on mental health. He explains the ideas that guide him and demonstrates how cuisine is a weapon against complacency and racism. Exhibiting the vulnerability of Andre Agassi’s Open and the vivid storytelling of Patti Smith’s Just Kids, this is a portrait of a modern America in which tenacity can overcome anything.
  4. The Women with Silver Wings Book Cover Picture

    The Women with Silver Wings

    by Katherine Sharp Landdeck

    “With the fate of the free world hanging in the balance, women pilots went aloft to serve their nation. . . . A soaring tale in which, at long last, these daring World War II pilots gain the credit they deserve.”—Liza Mundy, New York Times bestselling author of Code Girls
  5. The Red Lotus Book Cover Picture

    The Red Lotus

    by Chris Bohjalian

    A twisting story of love and deceit: an American man vanishes on a rural road in Vietnam, and his girlfriend, an emergency room doctor trained to ask questions, follows a path that leads her home to the very hospital where they met.
  6. Girl Decoded Book Cover Picture

    Girl Decoded

    by Rana el Kaliouby and Carol Colman

    In a captivating memoir, an Egyptian American visionary and scientist provides an intimate view of her personal transformation as she follows her calling—to humanize our technology and how we connect with one another.
  7. Redhead by the Side of the Road Book Cover Picture

    Redhead by the Side of the Road

    by Anne Tyler

    From the beloved and best-selling Anne Tyler, a sparkling new novel about misperception, second chances, and the sometimes elusive power of human connection.

    Buy now from your favorite retailer:

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

A Letter Explaining the Reason Behind the Choice of Writing “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” as Historically-Based, Rather than Historical Fiction

via A Letter Explaining the Reason Behind the Choice of Writing “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” as Historically-Based, Rather than Historical Fiction

Looking for Readers Willing to Review “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador”

The review only needs to be 2-3 sentences. If you are interested, email me at sherriemiranda1@aol.com. Let me know if you prefer a Mobi or a PDF.

It’s been a bit frustrating as I had three reviews recently that were NOT put on Amazon which is where many look for reviews even if they don’t buy from them. The reviews ended up in obscure places where they’ll never be seen.

The prequel to this novel “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” will be out in December.CoverEight_sherrie2015_33

Peace & justice for all,

Sherrie

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

An FB Connection tells me how much he loved “Secrets & Lies In El Salvador: Shelly’s Journey.”

51UX4f00CBL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

I can only hope he will post this on Amazon, as well as other places!                               Sherrie

Dear Sherrie,

I just finished reading your novel. I really enjoyed it. What a page-turner. I completed it in only 4–really 3+1/2 days. I continually had to discover what happened to the characters next.

Far from being mere mouthpieces, they were each real human beings with all a real human being’s combination of gifts and flaws. These, possessed more gifts, of course!

Rather than the two dimensional story we all too often learn of on TV or in the newspapers, you made the struggle in El Salvador truly come alive–both the land herself and the people living there.

You wrote a very lovely, poignant and memorable tale. Through seeing my gushy, purple words, you can tell I am absolutely sincere in my words of congratulations.

Warmest regards,                                                                                                                          Michael

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: 
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

2017 – Read the best of ADVENTURE Novel Stories from around the world:

“Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” will soon be out in Spanish – PLZ tell your Spanish speaking friends! Thanks!

Yes, I finally found a Salvadoran translator & editor with the help of BabelsBook. The critically acclaimed novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” should be very popular in Spanish as many Spanish speakers read the English version even though they seldom read in English.   51UX4f00CBL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Learn the story behind “Publish Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans.” and help us get this edited & published by the end of the year. @indiegogo
https://igg.me/at/CrimesImpunityNOLAnovel/8856231

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉
Learn the story behind “Publish Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans.” and help us meet our goal. @indiegogo
https://igg.me/at/CrimesImpunityNOLAnovel/8856231

Reviews of books read long ago “I, Rigoberta Menchu”

I read “I, Rigoberta Menchu,” a memoir about a Guatemalan Indian woman and her culture, some 25 plus years, ago after meeting Rigoberta in New Orleans.
This woman’s culture has been slaughtered by the tens of thousands (I recently read 250,000 Indians have been massacred). The culture she comes from is one of the kindest, most accepting people to ever grace this planet. They consider love beautiful, no matter who the couple is, so they are accepting of gays.
I wish I could remember all that I learned about this culture. Rigoberta stands out as a woman who probably would have been an introvert, but she was chosen to represent her people in the UN and so she was forced to become a public person. I remember that she was joining up with other Indigenous people all over the world.
I hope Rigoberta is still with us, taking her stories directly to the people of the world!

Peace, love & justice for all,                                                                                                        Sherrie                                                                                                                                             Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

Good News about the Film “The Boys Who Said No!”

Good news about the film- and a request!
Boys Who Said NO! – C Colorado Jones to youshow details
boys-logo 3.jpg
Judith Ehrlich, Director
Christopher C. Jones, Producer
Bill Prince, Co-Producer
Robert Cooney, Advisor
Steve Ladd, Advisor
Lee Swenson, Advisor
Robert Levering, Advisor
C. Colorado Jones Productions
P. O. Box 14008
San Francisco, CA 94114
[415] 812-8692

ccoloradojones@yahoo.com
http://www.boyswhosaidno.com

May 10, 2017

Dear Friends and Fellow Resisters,

We’re writing to share some good news with you – and a request!

The good news is, thanks to your support, director Judith Ehrlich is in the studio now with our chief editor working to craft a 90 minute rough cut from the many hours of interviews, archival footage, and music.

We are also excited because as part of our research for the film we found that reputable scholars concluded draft resistance had a significant impact – causing the collapse of the draft system and was a big factor in ending the Vietnam War.

With a broad “resistance” movement growing once again, telling this story on film is more important than we imagined when we first started production. If nonviolent resistance could stop a powerful military from carrying out an unjust war, imagine what nonviolent activists today can do!

There’s also some good news on the fundraising front. We were recently awarded a $75,000 grant! This is our biggest single contribution to date, and solid confirmation that the film is an important and timely one.

While that grant moves us closer to completing the flm, creating a high-quality documentary film requires substantial funding, especially in the last phases of production. The expenses alone associated with securing necessary rights and insurance are projected to be $88,000.

Thanks to you and 800 others, we have raised the majority of our budget – over $300,000. Now, to finish the film and begin distributing it we need to raise a final $200,000. We know we can get there!

Here’s our request of you:

In this last critical year of production, please consider making
a significant contribution to help us complete the film.

Can we count on you?

We are very grateful for your support to date! We could not have gotten this far without you.

On behalf of the BOYS film team, thank you again for your generous support — both your dollars and your far-reaching vision!

For peace, justice and equality,
Christopher Jones, Producer
Bill Prince, MD, Co-Producer
http://www.boyswhosaidno.com
P.S. – Remember that every dollar you donate to the film is tax-deductible and will reduce your tax dollars supporting Trump’s military buildup!
Donate online with a credit card. Or make a check out to the Resource Center for Nonviolence – RCNV – and send to PO Box 14008, San Francisco, CA 94114.
P.P.S. – Should you need more inspiration to make a donation, here’s a private link to preview a recently rough film segment on resistance actions at the Los Angeles induction center:

vimeo.com/211762647 Password: BWSN_LA

boys-logo 3.jpg

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

A Teacher's Reflections

Thirty Years of Wonder

Bonjour From Brittany

Celebrating what makes Brittany unique

Writer Shed Press

Independent Publishing

E-Author Resources

A great author and reader site

veereads

It's About Story

Rebecca Bryn

Author and artist

CollTales

Writings, pics, music, arts and difficult conversations

saania2806.wordpress.com/

Philosophy is all about being curious, asking basic questions. And it can be fun!

The Light Behind the Story

Seeking the magic and light in life's journeys

SJF Communications- 'Creative Ideas | Dynamic Results'

PR-Publicist-Marketing-Social Media, Websites, MSN-RN, LNC, Photography, Veteran, Actor, Writer, Coach

The Author's Mission

Writing to Discover Me

A Writer's Path

Sharing writing tips, information, and advice.

anntogether

AM Roselli's art & writing site

Rosie Amber

Book Reviewer, Avid Reader and Bookworm. Campaigning to link more readers to writers. People do not forget books that touch them or excite them—they recommend them.

Abuelita Semillita

Love in Literacy

A Few Words About …

Intersectionality, arts, culture, social justice, ∞

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