#PictureOfTheDay and #writingprompt: 05/Oct/21

Are you in the mood to be inspired? ❤

Stuart Aken

Pictures to entertain, spark interest, and inspire you to create with words or images, if you wish. Whether it’s a poem, story, play, novel, memory, essay, painting, drawing, sculpture, or another photograph is up to you.  Or you can just enjoy the pictures. My image is untitled to avoid directing anyone. But you can find the title here.

If you use the prompt, post a link to your work, or the work itself, in the comments section, if you want. Please credit me by linking to this post, to allow more people to see both our creations.

Have fun and get those creative juices flowing.

Sometimes, I’ll include my writing inspired by the image.

For a small selection of my pictures, see my Gallery, or for a full appreciation, click here.            

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It’s been a while since I shared my debut novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador”

Please keep in mind that SLIES is book 2 in the Shelly’s Journeys series so do read CIINO first. A short (2-3 sent.) review would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks to all my faithful followers & readers. ~Sherrie

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador: tinyurl.com/klxbt4y

Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc

So, wait until you’ve read the prequel to read SLIES. Here’s the info on that:

Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.

Why Do You Write?

You can see my response below. But why do YOU write?
Or, alternatively, why don’t you write?
Peace, love & justice for all,
Sherrie

A Writer's Path

by Kate Colby

If you’re reading this, I assume you want to be or already are a writer. I also assume that there’s a decent chance you want to be a full-time author. So, if that’s you, let me ask you two difficult questions: Why do you write? And why do you want to be a full-time author, when there are hundreds of easier career options?

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Becoming A Story Shaman: Unlock Your Creativity And End Writer’s Block for Good – by Marc Graham…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on The Creative Penn:

When you feel your creativity isn’t flowing easily, what do you do to get things moving again? Marc Graham shares tools and ideas for tapping into all your levels of consciousness to banish writers’ block forever.

_____________

Tell me if this sounds familiar.

One minute you’re writing along, the Muse is singing, your characters are cooperating, and even the cat is giving you room to type your fast-flowing words.

The next moment, you’re stalled. You’ve written yourself into a corner, your characters have rebelled, and the Muse has ditched you for a bender in Vegas.

Been there? I sure have.

Writer’s block is something we’ll all encounter from time to time. But by understanding the psychology of the creative process, exploring the nature and source of Story, and adding a few tried-and-true tools to your writing kit, you can open the floodgates to your…

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A Few Quotations On Books

Just found out last week was #BannedBooksWeek. I will try to find a post about the books that were banned BECAUSE WE NEED TO READ THEM ALL!
Until them, enjoy these quotes!

charles french words reading and writing

book-2152349_960_720 (1)

(https://pixabay.com)

italy-2510287_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

“A room without books is like a body without a soul.”

                                                                  Marcus Tullius Cicero

Jorge_Luis_Borges

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.”

                                                                 Jorge Luis Borges

Stephen_King,_Comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.”

                   …

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Black History Fun Fact Friday – The Truth About Uncle Tom

Really want to learn something? Go to Yecheilyah’s blog.

The PBS Blog

Uncle Tom has a legacy rich in racism and is a derogatory term applied to blacks who “sellout.” Sambo is also rich in racism and is a derogatory term. Historically, these two have been used interchangeably although they are not the same. These two are so intertwined in modern society and so incorporated into our language I am not sure they can ever be separated. It will be difficult to view them as anything other than names used to describe black people who betray other black people. (Think Tom Dubois on the social and political television comedy Boondocks.)

In this post, I will give some background on the Coon, the Sambo, and the Uncle Tom and reveal the truth on how Tom was not the sellout we have made him out to be.

Let’s start with the Coon caricature. The name is an abbreviation of the word Racoon so…

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LitHub: Sandra Cisneros on the Need for Dialogue With the Ones You Love

In Conversation with Mitchell Kaplan on The Literary Life Podcast


September 27, 2021

On today’s episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan talks to Sandra Cisneros about her new book, Martita, I Remember Youout now from Vintage.

From the episode:

Mitchell Kaplan: Let’s talk about dialogue. How does one approach that? Is there a solution? What would you like to see happen?

Sandra Cisneros: I would like to see that people dialogue with people they love, you know, because it’s real easy to shout at people you don’t know, but it’s very different to listen and dialogue with people who are your father or your brother or your sister or your child or your mother. I think these are, you know, to me, when I had to come to places where I had to discuss things, for example, I had to write a letter to a woman who wanted to ban House on Mango Street in her community, and she didn’t want her child to read it.

She’d had a very negative experience and she just thought her child should not read it, and I remember that my agent at that time dissuaded me from writing to her. I wanted to write her letter and dialogue. And my agent said, oh, no, you’re just going to waste your time. And I said, you know, I have some time this week. I’m traveling to Mexico, and I was going to write other things. I’m going to write this letter. And I had to imagine I was writing it to my father because he and I were often at odds in my life about everything. It caused me to write to her with a lot of respect and love. I think we’re not coming to this dialogues with respect and love because it’s just an abstract other person, the enemy.

But if you think about it being the person you love the most, then you’re not going to call them names or bash them or come with a big stick. You can come with respect, and that respect is mutual. The listening and the giving. And I think that’s not there in any of our conversations. That’s what so has pained me about what’s happening with America now. We’re not having those dialogues and places of love and respect.

________________________________

Subscribe now to The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan on iTunesSpotify, or wherever else you find your podcasts!

Poet, short story writer, novelist, essayist and artist, Sandra Cisneros is the author of Bad BoysMy Wicked Wicked Ways, Loose WomanWoman Hollering Creek and Other StoriesThe House on Mango StreetCarameloHave You Seen Marie?, Vintage Cisneros—a compilation of her works—and BravoBruno. Her most recent books are A House of My Own Stories from My Life, which is illustrated with photographs, and Puro Amor in a dual-language edition translated by Liliana Valenzuela and featuring illustrations by the author. Born in Chicago in 1954, she is a citizen of both the United States and Mexico. She makes her living by her pen.Lit Hub RadioMartita I Remember YouMitchell KaplanpodcastsSandra CisnerosThe Literary Life


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Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.