Reviews of books read long ago “I, Rigoberta Menchu”

I read “I, Rigoberta Menchu,” a memoir about a Guatemalan Indian woman and her culture, some 25 plus years, ago after meeting Rigoberta in New Orleans.
This woman’s culture has been slaughtered by the tens of thousands (I recently read 250,000 Indians have been massacred). The culture she comes from is one of the kindest, most accepting people to ever grace this planet. They consider love beautiful, no matter who the couple is, so they are accepting of gays.
I wish I could remember all that I learned about this culture. Rigoberta stands out as a woman who probably would have been an introvert, but she was chosen to represent her people in the UN and so she was forced to become a public person. I remember that she was joining up with other Indigenous people all over the world.
I hope Rigoberta is still with us, taking her stories directly to the people of the world!

Peace, love & justice for all,                                                                                                        Sherrie                                                                                                                                             Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to the Home page of her blog to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com
Or you can see it on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11Ch5chkAc 😉

Meet Author Sherri Miranda – An Interview

GNU JOURNAL

Between “Secrets and Lies,”

a Conversation with Author Sherri Miranda

BY FABRICIO CORREA

sherri-miranda
Fabricio Correa – What made you choose El Salvador as the background for your novel? What inspired you?

Sherri Miranda: I protested the US support of the civil war for more than ten years. I also was married to a Salvadoran during part of that time & went to ES in ’82. I went with a fact-finding delegation in ’02. By then, I knew I would write the story, but had little time & no idea how it would look.

The facts of the war & knowing my country supported it hurt me deeply. Then learning how loving & generous Salvadorans are brought me to the point that I HAD to write this novel. It wasn’t going away no matter what I did.

FC: You delve into harsh realities of a war-torn third world country. Would you…

View original post 729 more words

The Most Momentous Don Draper Quotes – Mad Men is gone, but Don Draper is still alive! Bring him back!

Don Draper was the ultimate salesman! He got people to buy his upper class background when those of us who watched the show from beginning to end knew that it was all a lie. Don (whose real name I have forgotten) was the son of a prostitute. But he was smart, handsome & had charisma, so, of course he made it it the world of Advertising.

Similar to Don’t 1st quote is one by my RIT Art professor. He said “What people are buying is beauty and happiness,” then he jumped up on a desk in the Art class “But neither happiness OR beauty can be bought … so these people will continue buying for the rest of their lives to try & get what can’t be bought!”

I totally can see Don Draper becoming an Art professor & telling his students this. And if he invents a way for cats to use the toilet, then I will know HE WAS MY PROFESSOR ALL ALONG!  😉  ❤  😉  ❤  😉  ❤

http://www.magicalquote.com/the-most-momentous-don-draper-quotes/

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can go to her Home page to watch it:
https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com Or go to YouTube & type in the title of her novel! 😉 ❤

5* Review of Ethan Canin’s “Carry Me Across the Water”

5 stars The story of a man who had a fascinating & love-filled life!
Reviewed By Sherrie Miranda
This review is for: Carry Me Across the Water: A Novel 88293.jpg
My book has a different cover from the two on Amazon. I can see why. I thought I was going to be reading a book about a Japanese person, not a book about a young Jewish boy who escapes Nazi Germany!
This is the story of one man’s brave, yet often difficult life. August Kleinman’s mother saw what was coming, so she left with her son in the middle of a dark, foggy night, leaving behind a very wealthy German Jew husband, Augusts’s father.
This book became more and more enjoyable, the more I read. Kleinman appreciated every stage of his life and lived it to the fullest. Even in old age, he had his son, daughter-in-law (who appreciated him more than his son did) and his grandson. He also had a secret friend, a young Latina woman with a child, that he tried to help. He felt it was the least he could do after hoarding millions most of his life.
And then there was the Japanese connection, created because of the war. Even though he killed the owner of the letters, Kleinman felt he needed to see the Japanese man’s son and give him the letters that would explain who he was.
As always, when one loves a story, I didn’t want it to end. I will be looking to read Canin’s other novels very soon!
Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

Cry, Heart, But Never Break: A Remarkable Illustrated Meditation on Loss and Life

Cry, Heart, But Never Break: A Remarkable Illustrated Meditation on Loss and Life
“Who would enjoy the sun if it never rained? Who would yearn for the day if there were no night?”
BY MARIA POPOVA

From brain pickings:  https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/03/08/cry-heart-but-never-break/?mc_cid=220fd0b955&mc_eid=fa29a87840

“Each day, we wake slightly altered, and the person we were yesterday is dead,” John Updike wrote, “so why … be afraid of death, when death comes all the time?” Half a millennium earlier, Montaigne posed the same question somewhat differently in his magnificent meditation on death and the art of living: “To lament that we shall not be alive a hundred years hence, is the same folly as to be sorry we were not alive a hundred years ago.”

Yet mortality continues to petrify us — our own, and perhaps even more so that of our loved ones. And if the adult consciousness is so thoroughly unsettled by the notion of death, despite intellectually recognizing it as a necessary and inevitable part of life, how is the child consciousness to settle into comprehension and comfort?

Now comes a fine addition to the most intelligent and imaginative children’s books about making sense of death — the crowning jewel of them all, even, and not only because it bears what might be the most beautiful children’s book title ever conceived: Cry, Heart, But Never Break (public library) by beloved Danish children’s book author Glenn Ringtved and illustrator Charlotte Pardi, translated into English by Robert Moulthrop.

Although Ringtved is celebrated for his humorous and mischievous stories, this contemplative tale sprang from the depths of his own experience — when his mother was dying and he struggled to explain what was happening to his young children, she offered some words of comfort: “Cry, Heart, but never break.” It was the grandmother’s way of assuring the children that the profound sadness of loss is to be allowed rather than resisted, then folded into the wholeness of life, which continues to unfold. (I’m reminded of Maria Kalman’s unforgettable words: “When Tibor died, the world came to an end. And the world did not come to an end. That is something you learn.”)

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This warmly wistful story begins outside the “small snug house” where four children live with their beloved grandmother. Not wanting to scare the young ones, Death, who has come for the old lady, has left his scythe by the door. Immediately, in this small and enormously thoughtful gesture, we are met with Death’s unexpected tenderness.

Inside, he sits down at the kitchen table, where only the youngest of the kids, little Leah, dares look straight at him.

What makes the book particularly touching, thanks to Pardi’s immensely expressive illustration, is just how crestfallen — broken, even — Death himself looks the entire time he is executing his mission, choked up with some indiscernible fusion of resignation and recompense.

In the quiet, the children could hear their grandmother upstairs, breathing with the same raspy breaths as the figure at the table. They knew Death had come for her and that time was short.

To stall the inevitable, the children devise a plan — believing that Death only works at night, they decide to keep refilling his coffee cup until dawn comes, at which point he would have to leave without their grandmother. Here, too, one is struck by the ordinariness of Death, for what can be more ordinary — and life-loving, even — than to enjoy a cup of coffee at the kitchen table?

But Death eventually curls his bony hand over the cup to signal that the time has come. Leah reaches her own tiny hand, taking his in hers, and beseeches him not to take their darling grandmother. Why, she insists, does grandma have to die?

Some people say Death’s heart is as dead and black as a piece of coal, but that is not true. Beneath his inky cloak, Death’s heart is as red as the most beautiful sunset and beats with a great love of life.

Death is once more overcome with kindness and compassion for the children, so he decides to answer Leah’s question with a story, hoping it would help them understand why dying is natural and necessary.

He tells them of two brothers named Sorrow and Grief, who lived in a somber valley and went about their days “slowly and heavily” because they never looked up, because “they never saw through the shadows on the tops of the hills.”

Beyond those shadows, Death tells the kids, lived two sisters, Joy and Delight.

They were bright and sunny and their days were full of happiness. The only shadow was their sense that something was missing. They didn’t know what, but they felt they couldn’t fully enjoy their happiness.

As Death is telling the story, little Leah nods her head, for she can tell what is to come — the two boys meet the two girls and they fall in love, two perfectly balanced couples: Sorrow and Joy, Grief and Delight.

Death tells the kids:

It is the same with life and death… What would life be worth if there were no death? Who would enjoy the sun if it never rained? Who would yearn for the day if there were no night?

cryheartbutneverbreak4.jpg

Something difficult and beautiful has sunk in.

When death finally gets up from the table to head upstairs, the youngest boy is moved to stop him — but his older brother puts a rueful hand on his shoulder and gently discourages him.

Moments later, the children heard the upstairs window open. Then, in a voice somewhere between a cry and a whisper, Death said, “Fly, Soul. Fly, fly away.”

They hurry upstairs, where their grandmother has died — a moment of great sadness, enveloped in warm peacefulness.

The curtains were blowing in the gentle morning breeze. Looking at the children, Death said quietly, “Cry, Heart, but never break. Let your tears of grief and sadness help begin new life.”

Then he was gone.

Ever after, whenever the children opened a window, they would think of their grandmother. And when the breeze caressed their faces, they could feel her touch.

Cry, Heart, But Never Break comes from the courageous Enchanted Lion, who have brought to life such daring and deeply nuanced picture-books as The Tiger Who Would Be King, Little Boy Brown, The Lion and the Bird, and Louis I, King of the Sheep.

I share this in the hope that it helps others as much as it helps me. I know my 85 year old dad must go sometime & my sister reminded me “So do you.” She’s the one who took my mom’s death so hard, but maybe her recent heart surgery has given her a different take on life. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this. SM   😉  ❤ 

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too. You can watch it on her Home page. https://sherriemiranda1.wordpress.com  Or go to YouTube & type in the title of her novel!  😉  ❤

I had a review in the Sept. issue of InD’tale!

Secrets and Lies in El Salvador: Shelly’s Journey, by Sherrie Miranda
Genre: Historical
In “Secrets and Lies in El Salvador: Shelly’s Journey,” a young woman seeking solace from personal tragedy travels to El Salvador on behalf of a ministry to take photos of its citizenry. Shelly is warmly welcomed by her host family, the Gonzales, soon becoming a part of their close-knit but secret-keeping family. As she takes pictures of each member, they reveal those secrets and draw her deeper into their world, the struggle of the Salvadoran people, and their personal struggles related to generations of secrets that have molded their lives to its current state.

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This is a firsthand journey into perilous El Salvador in the early 1980s, when the country is torn by a war between a rich landholder-controlled government and the guerillas that are fighting for the everyday people who are systematically abused, disenfranchised, and often killed. Shelly has a family relationship to a poet who was a national hero, and as she spends time in the country, she evolves to feel a deep bond to its people and anguish for their sufferings. The narrative is emotive and involving, drawing the reader into what Shelly sees and feels. While the reader is spared gratuitous descriptions, there are moments and happenings that a sensitive reader will find disturbing, and the continual assault of horrors is wearying. This story will make readers feel the anguish and righteous anger at the plight of Salvadorans, as it opens readers’ eyes to the situation in El Salvador in the latter part of the 20th Century.

Danielle Hill

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

Give the gift of Love & Spirituality! “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is an anti-war story with a spiritual message & a message about the power of LOVE!

If you need some gifts for some readers, this is a book that has a spiritual message, as well as a message about family and the power of love!

Sherrie Miranda’s historically based, coming of age, Adventure novel “Secrets & Lies in El Salvador” is about an American girl in war-torn El Salvador:
http://tinyurl.com/klxbt4y

51UX4f00CBL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Her husband made a video for her novel. He wrote the song too:

Gone from My Sight . . . On Death & Dying

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPx-qpos57g

Discovering grief, loss, and the dying experience, presented by Barbara Karnes…
YOUTUBE.COM
Sherrie Miranda
 I wish SOMEONE had told me tears are beautiful before this! I have been a big cry baby all my life! Being with Angelo has helped me not cry so much. But then in 2013, we lost Angelo’s mom and 16 days later, my mother died. I am very grateful to Angelo and ALL his family because they taught me how to let go. Now, I mostly only cry for my mom. In fact, I did that yesterday. (There I go again!) But my tears are mostly tears of joy, tears that say “Mom, I am so lucky to have had you as my mother. Thank you, Mom, for all I’ve learned from you.”
Just know that if your mom is ready to go, you have to let her. We could have kept my mom (technically) alive but we knew she wouldn’t really be with us. Her body would be here, but her mind & heart wouldn’t be alive. We also know that her LOVE would ALWAYS be with us.  ❤  ❤  ❤  ❤

During the civil war in El Salvador, the people would say the names of the dead and the people would answer back “Presente!” They believe the dead are always alive in our hearts and minds. It is so true. Remember all the things you learned from your loved one & be grateful for having them in your life, for having known them & loved them & for the love they had for you . . . Mom, you always live in my heart & I think of you every time I fold clothes, every time I cook something you taught me and every time I remember one of your sayings that you probably got from your grandmother. You will never be forgotten . . .  ❤  ❤  ❤  ❤  ❤
Sherrie Miranda’s “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans” follows the dramatic story of naive, sheltered Shelly going to “The Big Easy” to prepare for El Salvador, but has no idea she will encounter sexism and witness racism as well as illegal activities by government agents.
https://www.amzn.com/dp/B08KMHNNDK
Author, Sherrie Miranda’s husband made the trailer for “Crimes & Impunity in New Orleans.” He wrote the music too. 
https://youtu.be/7_NL-V9KEi4
Review: Shelly’s journey in “the city that care forgot.”
Sherrie Miranda’s new novel “Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans” puts the reader into a whirlwind of political protests, abusive police, sexist attitudes towards women, and “good old boys” racism in 1980’s New Orleans. Miranda’s second novel follows Shelly, the young northerner, as she quickly finds out that she “isn’t in Kansas anymore” while encountering a slew of picturesque, colorful characters. Reading her book makes you wonder if justice and respect for blacks, immigrants, and women can be reality in America.